Minnesota Prairie Roots

Writing and photography by Audrey Kletscher Helbling

A brutally cold Sunday in Minnesota January 4, 2015

Filed under: Uncategorized — Audrey Kletscher Helbling @ 8:00 PM
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TODAY APPEARED deceptively lovely. Blue sky. Sunshine. Fresh layer of snow overnight.

A rural scene along Interstate 35 north of the Northfield, Minnesota, exit.

A rural scene along Interstate 35 north of the Northfield, Minnesota, exit.

But appearance is not reality.

On this Sunday in Southern Minnesota, the temp dipped to minus two degrees Fahrenheit by late afternoon.

A tough job on a cold day, cleaning up after a crash.

A tough job on a cold day, cleaning up after a crash.

On Highway 36 in Roseville, a Minnesota state trooper faced the unenviable task of clearing debris from a crash scene. Only his cheeks and nose appeared visible from behind a black mask as he worked in the brutal cold. He faced the additional danger of two lanes of heavy traffic propelling toward him. All it would take is one inattentive driver…

Steam hangs heavy in the air during cold spells.

Steam hangs heavy in the air during cold spells.

Near downtown Minneapolis, smokestacks billowed steam, always more prominent on days like today.

A sun dog photographed from Interstate 35 between the Northfield and Faribault exits.

A sun dog photographed from Interstate 35 between the Northfield and Faribault exits.

As day shifted to evening, sun dogs showed up, bright columns of light flanking the sun.

Another sun dog, photographed just before the first Interstate 35 exit southbound into Faribault.

Another sun dog, photographed just before the first Interstate 35 exit southbound into Faribault.

It’s been one cold day in Minnesota.

Β© Copyright 2015 Audrey Kletscher Helbling

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31 Responses to “A brutally cold Sunday in Minnesota”

  1. chlost Says:

    And it will be a very cold night. Doesn’t it make you wonder how the pioneers made it through this stuff? We grumble and we have central heating and down comforters. They certainly were hardy.

    • Yes, our ancestors were definitely a hardy bunch.

      My son and I were discussing this very topic the other day. Why did our forefathers move to Minnesota, of all states? Land and opportunity.

      Windchill here this a.m. is minus 30.

  2. cecilia Says:

    Winter has come.. c

  3. treadlemusic Says:

    Just walked down the drive from son#2/DIL’s place. The cold HURT!!!! And it won’t be getting any better in the coming 4 days. Praying for His mercies for all………..

  4. Dan Traun Says:

    Cold is right – criminy. The car certainly didn’t appreciate being started this a.m.

  5. The sun dogs are beautiful. Yet they make me shiver even though I am indoors. I feel bad for anyone who was out in that yesterday.

  6. I remember standing at the bus stop in my sophomore year in Marshall. I looked like a grizzly bear I was so bundled up. Cold trumped high school vanity every time in Minnesota. Brrrrr. Your photos convey that sense of cold beautifully.

  7. Love the Sun Dogs πŸ™‚ I do not miss that COLD in the Frozen Tundra – where all skin pretty much has to be covered – makes me cold thinking about it – BRRR!!!

  8. Don Singsaas Says:

    Brrr cold weather there! I realize that Alaska is expected to have cold weather and it does. Today the temps in the surrounding area of where I am range from minus 22 to minus 41 F, however a sign malfunctioned on one of our major roads and showed the temperature at 216 degrees above. Now that would be way too hot! It seems that the human body is designed to operate most efficiently at 65 to 75 degree but yet we insist on living in areas much hotter or colder and thus must make an artificial environment to live in i.e. heating systems and air conditioning systems! Humans are funny animals……………………..

  9. Don Singsaas Says:

    Tropical, right you are! Can’t wait!

  10. Jackie Says:

    Minnesota cold for sure. Love the sundog pics…so pretty.


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