Minnesota Prairie Roots

Writing and photography by Audrey Kletscher Helbling

Documenting Faribault’s latest flood, the third since 2010 September 22, 2016

Filed under: Uncategorized — Audrey Kletscher Helbling @ 9:55 PM
Tags: , , , , , , ,
Locals are drawn under the viaduct that links the west and east side of Faribault during yet another flood in our community caused by excessive rainfall. Here the Straight River runs

Locals are drawn under the viaduct Thursday evening during yet another flood in our community caused by excessive rainfall. Here the Straight River runs over its banks. A flood warning continues until 5 a.m. Friday.

 

THE SCENES ARE ALL TOO FAMILIAR.

 

The water has risen so high that the Cannon River dam is no longer visible next to the Faribault Woolen Mill.

 

The dam no longer visible.

 

 

A line of sandbags protect the mill operation and retail store along the banks of the Cannon River.

 

Sandbags stacked outside the Faribault Woolen Mill.

 

Police tape runs along the sidewalk on Second Avenue between the Faribault Woolen Mill and Faribault Foods.

Second Avenue between the Faribault Woolen Mill and Faribault Foods.

Police tape.

Several blocks of Second Avenue by the Cannon River are closed.

Several blocks of Second Avenue from Faribault Foods (left), past the Woolen Mill (right) to Caseys General Store were closed. The street runs past the Cannon River.

Roads barricaded.

Onlookers gather at the bridge entry to Teepee Tonka Park, now flooded by the Straight River.

The bridge entry to Teepee Tonka Park, now flooded by the Straight River.

And locals gathered by the dozens to document the scenes, to see how the mighty Cannon and Straight Rivers have once again overflowed their banks.

 

This Twin Cities news crew, parked near the Rice County Fairgrounds entry Thursday evening, was filming at the Faribault Woolen Mill.

 

A Twin Cities TV crew comes, too, pulled by the current of a news story.

 

Locals headed across the Faribault Woolen Mill parking lot toward the rising Cannon River.

Locals head across the Faribault Woolen Mill parking lot toward the rising Cannon River.

 

While the gawkers gawk, the sun draws a slim line of gold between grey clouds and glassy water.

 

Three police vehicles pulled into the Faribault Foods parking lot to check on folks checking out the flooded river along Second Avenue.

 

Police and firefighters watch the river watchers.

 

The Straight River rages toward the Faribault wastewater treatment plant.

 

Blocks away the Straight River churns muddy brown, raging under the bridge near the wastewater treatment plant.

 

A hastily built berm and sandbags protect the treatment plant.

 

Truckers haul dirt to construct a make-shift temporary berm protecting this city infrastructure.

 

During past floods, there have been issues with the sewer system.

As in past floods, the city has had to deal with sewer issues. This scene is by South Alexander Park.

Memories of the September 2010 and June 2014 floods linger.

 

A flooded street by Heritage Park near the Straight river close to downtown.

A flooded street by Heritage Park near the Straight River close to downtown.

I’ve walked these roads, these sidewalks, these parking lots, this grass before, documenting the flooding.

 

In the midst of the flooding, beauty is reflected, here on the Cannon River.

In the midst of the flooding, beauty is reflected, here on the Cannon River near the Faribault Woolen Mill.

Still the scenes pull me here, into the quiet of an autumn night for the third flood in seven years.

© Copyright 2016 Audrey Kletscher Helbling

Advertisements
 

22 Responses to “Documenting Faribault’s latest flood, the third since 2010”

  1. Marilyn Says:

    A creek flowed directly behind our 1 acre property when I was a kid. These photos bring back memories of our fascination with the high water marks when the stream was in full spate. A dangerous fascination indeed!

  2. Dan Traun Says:

    One drawback of living in/around a river town. Water is a powerful thing; it amazes me how quickly flooding can devastate an area. Hopefully this bought will not cause too much damage.

  3. I have been chanting recede and sending prayers of dryness. My parents worry me enough with being full-time RVers and driving cross country and yet again dealing with flooding (lost their RV last time). Your last photo is beautiful. Be Safe and Take Care – Sending Prayers.

  4. No fun. Stay safe and dry

  5. Bernadette Thomasy Says:

    So sorry to hear of the flooding; hopefully past experience will help in saving property. Praying for end of the rain.

  6. Don Says:

    Wow, I pray that the water flows on to its destination peacefully with no appreciable damage to anyone either up or down stream!

  7. Valerie Says:

    We just arrived home and stopped downtown Northfield’s post office to get our mail. It’s across from the river. So much water…

  8. Sue Ready Says:

    Thanks for sharing I have company this weekend who have relatives in the area. Your photos are wonderful and I particularly liked this line
    A Twin Cities TV crew comes, too, pulled by the current of a news story.
    The forces of nature are something that we need to pay attention to and considering the devastation we have had from storms as it forever alters the landscape..

  9. Gunny Says:

    Be Safe!

    Being long in tooth, I have seen and have been somewhat trapped by what are called “100 Year” floods that have occurred across this country, 2 in New Mexico, 1 in California. I have heard of a number of them that have affected family members, the Red River at Fargo / Moorhead being but one. I have read of a flood that affected Red Wing (MiN) turning that town (late 1800s) into an island. Be Safe and put your notes into your files. You may want to know a safe way out of your area in case of future disasters. May the Almighty keep you all safe.

    • The flooding is contained to certain areas of town and not one I live in. Local officials seem to have this flood reaction down to a science now. I talked to a cop on Friday evening who was watching the river, reporting measurements every three hours.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s