Minnesota Prairie Roots

Writing and photography by Audrey Kletscher Helbling

Restored Tilt-A-Whirl car unveiled in Faribault August 21, 2014

THANKS TO TWO FARIBAULT WOMEN, a group of enthusiastic supporters and a television show, one of America’s most iconic amusement rides, the Tilt-A-Whirl, will now be showcased in downtown Faribault.

Tami Schluter, left, and Peggy Keilen reveal the restored car to an appreciative audience Wednesday evening.

Tami Schluter, left, and Peggy Keilen reveal the restored car to an appreciative audience Wednesday evening.

A restored early 1950s era prototype Tilt-A-Whirl car was unveiled Wednesday evening in Faribault following the airing of “Boy Meets Whirl,” an episode of The History Channel’s American Restoration reality TV show.

The Tilt-A-Whirl car before restoration was rescued from a junkyard.

The Tilt-A-Whirl car, before restoration, was rescued from a junkyard. Photo courtesy of Tami Schluter.

Rick’s Restorations of Las Vegas worked its magic on the aged car after meeting with Faribault resident Tami Schluter. She, along with friend Peggy Keilen, spearheaded efforts to raise monies to restore the car built by Faribault’s Sellner Manufacturing Company. Backers raised $8,500 to refurbish the vintage carnival ride car rescued from, and donated by, Harley’s Auto Salvage.

A portion of the crowd watches "Boy Meets Whirl."

A portion of the crowd who supported the project with monetary and in-kind donations watches “Boy Meets Whirl.”

The Tilt-A-Whirl car, now on temporary display at Mill City Restaurant & Sports Bar—site of the celebration party—will find a permanent home a block away at the corner of (128) Central Avenue and Second Street by the third-generation family shoe store, Burkhartzmeyer Shoes.

Celebrating the restoration and reveal of the 1950s Tilt-A-Whirl car outside Mill City Restaurant.

Celebrating the restoration and reveal of the 1950s Tilt-A-Whirl car outside Mill City Restaurant.

Schluter and Keilen told the crowd of 75 or so gathered for the TV airing and car debut party that the restored Tilt-A-Whirl represents a much-needed icon for this Minnesota community’s historic downtown, a need revealed in a 2011 Faribault Main Street Market study. The two businesswomen—Schluter co-owns the Historic Hutchinson House Bed & Breakfast and Keilen, Faribo Air Conditioning & Heating—say the car will provide a place to sit back, relax and enjoy the beautiful downtown.

Tami Schluter, left, and Peggy Keilen embrace after unveiling the car.

Tami Schluter, left, and Peggy Keilen embrace after unveiling the car.

And the Tilt-A-Whirl car likely will provide plenty of photo ops as it did following Wednesday’s reveal. An enthusiastic Schluter and Keilen posed for numerous photos and expressed their love for Faribault and gratitude to the long list of supporters that include individuals, businesses and local organizations.

Tami Schluter on "Boy Meets Whirl."

Tami Schluter on “Boy Meets Whirl.” She suggested the three pretend to be watching a Minnesota Vikings game while sitting in the car.

Both were especially pleased to bring national attention to Faribault via the television show, one reason Schluter approached American Restoration about the project. Within 12 hours, she heard that the Tilt-A-Whirl proposal was a go.

Tami Schluter's quote reaction when she saw the car for the first time.

Tami Schluter’s quote, as aired on “Boy Meets Whirl,” when she saw the car for the first time.

The women aren’t done yet with Tilt-A-Whirls. They are already focusing on raising funds for restoration of a second 1940s car to be placed several blocks to the north by the State Bank of Faribault.

The 1950s era Tilt-A-Whirl car sits, covered, outside Mill City until after the 9:30 p.m. airing of "Boy Meets Whirl."

The 1950s era Tilt-A-Whirl car sits, covered, outside Mill City before the airing of “Boy Meets Whirl.”

That second restoration, Keilen says, will be done in the Tilt-A-Whirl’s hometown of Faribault.

Sellner Manufacturing, as noted on the car, invented the Tilt-A-Whirl.

Sellner Manufacturing, as noted on the car, invented the Tilt-A-Whirl.

FYI: Sellner Manufacturing, which invented and built the first Tilt-A-Whirl in 1926, was sold in 2011. Gold Star Manufacturing purchased the fiberglass and staging part of the business and, at the time of purchase, contracted with Texas-based buyer Larson International, Inc., to make the fiberglass car portion of the Tilt-A-Whirl.

The Mural Society of Faribault created and placed the Tilt-A-Whirl mural on the side of Jim's Auto & Tire this past fall.

The Mural Society of Faribault created and placed a Tilt-A-Whirl mural in downtown Faribault in 2010.

Faribault also promotes the Tilt-A-Whirl’s origins via a mural along Fourth Street just a block off Central Avenue. It was a 2010 project of The Mural Society of Faribault.

The back of the refurbished Tilt-A-Whirl.

The back of the refurbished Tilt-A-Whirl.

The Rice County Historical Society in Faribault features a permanent exhibit on Sellner Manufacturing Company.

Mill City's new signature Tilt-A-Whirl drink.

Mill City’s new signature Tilt-A-Whirl drink.

And, at Mill City Restaurant & Sports Bar, a Tilt-A-Whirl drink has been added to the bar offerings. It features brandy, Mount Gay Bermuda rum, sweet vermouth, sweet and sour mix, cherries and lemon slices served in a pint jar.

BONUS PHOTO:

Every party needs a cake.

Every party needs a cake.

 

© Copyright 2014 Audrey Kletscher Helbling

 

Celebrating my community’s many cultures at International Festival Faribault

IN A SOUTHERN MINNESOTA COMMUNITY which is growing ever more diverse, the need for understanding among cultures seems not an option, but a must.

A Somali family waits to cross a street in downtown Faribault. Minnesota Prairie Roots file photo 2010.

A Somali family waits to cross a street in downtown Faribault. Minnesota Prairie Roots file photo 2010.

If we’re to live and work and play in the same town, then we need to meet one another, to educate ourselves, to be open to the differences that define us.

International Festival Faribault presents an opportunity to do just that from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. this Saturday, August 23. Via music, ethnic food, art, children’s activities and more, the cultures of our diverse community will be showcased and celebrated in Central Park.

Several Latinos lead in singing of Mexico's national anthem last September during the International Festival Faribault at Faribault's Central Park.

Several Latinos lead in singing of Mexico’s national anthem during a previous International Festival Faribault at Faribault’s Central Park. Minnesota Prairie Roots file photo.

At the hour-long flag ceremony, which begins at 11:30 a.m., the flags and national anthems of 18 nations, from the U.S. to Somalia, South Sudan, Mexico and more will be presented. It’s a moving ceremony that visually impresses the diversity of those who call Faribault and the surrounding area home.

A Mexican dish (help me out if you know, but I think tortillas) was wrapped in banana leaves. My husband and I tried this.

A Mexican dish wrapped in banana leaves. My husband and I tried this at a past fest. Minnesota Prairie Roots file photo.

And then there are food booths, where you can sample ethnic dishes from countries like Somalia, Honduras, Norway and more.

Lul Abdi shows off beautiful wood crafts from Kenya and Somalia.

Lul Abdi shows off beautiful wood crafts from Kenya and Somalia during a past fest. Minnesota Prairie Roots file photo.

Others will vend native art.

Served at the 2011 fest: Guatemalan chuchitos-- chicken, corn and salsa wrapped in a corn husk.  You'll find numerous vendors offering a variety of authentic international foods.

Served at the 2011 fest: Guatemalan chuchitos– chicken, corn and salsa wrapped in a corn husk. You’ll find numerous vendors offering a variety of authentic international foods. Minnesota Prairie Roots file photo.

I’ve attended this festival several times and each time have left with a better understanding of my neighbors. The key is to visit with folks who are from a country other than your own. Don’t just buy a chuchito or a tamale or some other food and walk away. Chat it up with the vendor.

Faribault High School seniors Shukri Aden, left, and Khadra Muhumed.

At a past fest, I spoke with then Faribault High School seniors Shukri Aden, left, and Khadra Muhumed. Minnesota Prairie Roots file photo.

I am convinced that personal connections are the key to understanding and overcoming the barriers that separate cultures.

Conversation and connecting..., no other words necessary.

Conversing and connecting at a previous fest. Minnesota Prairie Roots file photo.

Long-time residents and newbies alike must reach out to one another to bridge the gaps of misunderstandings and preconceived notions that exist. And they do. Exist. I hear the prejudicial comments way too often. We must learn to respect one another.

That same little boy who was so intently focused on the musician.

One of my favorite fest portraits. Minnesota Prairie Roots file photo.

It is the kids who give me the most hope. They don’t seem to notice the differences in skin color, language and culture. And they are a primary focus of International Festival Faribault. The local United Way will give away children’s books. There will be a children’s dance performance and a bouncy tent.

Happy children all focused on the same goal: breaking the pinata.

Happy children all focused on the same goal: breaking the pinata near the Central Park Bandshell. Minnesota Prairie Roots file photo.

But the highlight, in my opinion, is the breaking of piñatas at 3:30 p.m. I’ve witnessed this event several times with children of many ethnic backgrounds standing side-by-side. Their smiles are wide. And so are those of the adults observing how piñatas can bring together cultures. Together.

A member of Ollin Ayacaxtli dances at Faribault's International Market Day celebration.

A member of Ollin Ayacaxtli dances at a past fest. Minnesota Prairie Roots file photo.

Here’s a schedule of festival events:

10 – 10:45 a.m.: Otto & Celia, Hispanic singers on keyboard
10:45 – 11 a.m.: Selvia, Guatemalan dancer
11 – 11:30 a.m.: Ollin Ayacaxtli Aztec Dancers
11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.: Flag ceremony
12:30 – 1 p.m.: Children’s dance performance by Florecitas de Dios
1 – 2 p.m.: River Mill Band performs (combination of newgrass and folk)
2 – 3 p.m.: South Sudanese music and dancers
3 – 3:30 p.m.: Hula hoop performance by Adrienne Lee & Jugglers
3:30 p.m.: Breaking of piñatas and end of silent auction

A little girl stands on the opposite side of the group of children waiting to swing at the pinata.

A little girl stands on the opposite side of the group of children waiting to swing at the pinata. Minnesota Prairie Roots file photo.

Additionally, non-profits will be at the festival to focus on immigrants. Rice County Public Health will give guided tours of the Faribault Farmer’s Market (also happening at the park during morning hours) in Somali and Spanish. The American Association of University Women will offer children’s activities. HealthFinders Collaborative, the Faribault Diversity Coalition, Greater Upper Nile Community Services & Development and more will also be at the fest. A silent auction features about $3,000 in donated items.

To learn more about International Festival Faribault, click here. And then click here.

© Copyright 2014 Audrey Kletscher Helbling