Minnesota Prairie Roots

Writing and photography by Audrey Kletscher Helbling

Community pride: A vision & two gardens, all because she cares about Faribault August 26, 2015

Behind several of these buildings in downtown Faribault, two gardens have been created.

Behind several of these buildings in downtown Faribault, two gardens have been created.

WITHIN MY COMMUNITY, there’s a new sense of optimism rising, a positivity that shouts “community pride.”

Rather than whine and complain about what Faribault lacks, locals are taking action. They are finding solutions and digging in to make this city an even better place.

Several months ago, the Faribault Daily News began publishing good news snippets on the editorial page every Saturday, citing examples of local community pride. This came after editor Jaci Smith called Faribault residents out on their negative attitudes about our community. A group, Citizens in Action, has formed locally to assist with clean-up and other public and private projects in the Faribault area. And recently the Faribault Foundation awarded its first ever Community Pride grants of $500 each to four projects that reflect exactly that—community pride.

The Second Street Garden, started last year and still in development.

The Second Street Garden, started last year and still in development.

Businesswoman, crafter and all-around optimistic long-time Faribault resident Dee Bjork received one of those grants for the Second Street Garden, a mini garden she began developing last year on a once blighted space in the heart of downtown. It’s a work in progress and a spin-off of a garden she created six years ago behind her sister and brother-in-law’s flooring store next to The Crafty Maven, the business she and another sister run.

Dee is a go-getter, a woman who cares deeply for her community and those who live here. She is always smiling and helping and encouraging.

That is how this all started, when Dee noticed a mom sitting on a bath towel on a curb downtown watching her kids play. She remembered her own childhood. Her mom lounged in a lawn chair, sipping iced tea while watching Dee and her siblings play ball in their yard.

Dee and Michelle

Dee and Michelle. Photo courtesy of Dee Bjork at The Crafty Maven.

Dee wanted the same for families living downtown. So she created Michelle’s Garden, named after a young girl she had begun mentoring. Michelle, now a teen, still lives downtown Faribault with her family and remains near and dear.

A street side view of the space now occupied by the Second Street Garden.

A street side view of the space now occupied by the Second Street Garden.

A lovely sign defines the garden.

A lovely sign defines the garden.

Beautiful flowers and plants spill from containers at Dufour's Cleaners next to the garden.

Beautiful flowers and plants spill from containers at Dufour’s Cleaners next to the garden.

With the success of Michelle’s Garden, the focus shifted recently to another spot, a vacant area between a dry cleaner and a hair salon. Dee wanted, she said, “to create a beautiful space outside in a space that was neglected but had potential.”

Flowers spill from a raised bed in the Second Street Garden.

Flowers spill from a raised bed in the Second Street Garden.

She wants the Second Street Garden to become a multi-purpose green space for those who live, work and shop downtown.

A side view of the Second Street Garden.

A side view of the Second Street Garden.

Already the lot, once filled with rock and debris and generally neglected, is shaping into an oasis of flowers and vegetables. Neighbors, gardeners, church members, youth and more—70 people, according to the list Dee’s kept—have worked together to create the two downtown gardens. There have been cash and plant donations, too, and a community planting day.

Plans call for latticework to eventually hide these utility boxes.

Plans call for latticework to eventually hide these utility boxes.

A splash of flowers in the garden.

A splash of flowers pop color into the garden.

Potted tomatoes will eventually be planted in yet to be built raised beds.

Tomatoes will eventually be planted in yet to be built raised beds rather than in pots.

And now Dee has that $500 Community Pride grant, and is seeking additional funding to continue with her vision for the Second Street Garden. A concrete pad will be poured for the dumpster and garbage containers that sit on a side of the lot, a necessity for those who occupy the adjoining building. The dumpster will also be fenced. She plans, too, to have a concrete pad installed for seating under a pergola. The city has promised a picnic table for seasonal placement. Latticework on the pergola will hide utility boxes. More raised beds are planned for the tomatoes that now grow in pots along a wall.

Gorgeous petunias add color to the garden.

Gorgeous petunias add color to the garden.

A dog waits on stairs overlooking the garden.

A dog waits on stairs overlooking the garden.

Veggies to give away.

Garden veggies.

Already the two gardens are lush with growing vegetables—tomatoes, squash, eggplant, peppers, brussel sprouts, kohlrabi, broccoli and zucchini—to be distributed among those downtown and also shared with customers at The Crafty Maven.

Encouraging words posted at the garden.

Encouraging words posted at the garden.

Dee saw a problem and solved it. And because of that, Faribault’s downtown is a better place.

FYI: Check back tomorrow to learn about another project that has been funded by the Faribault Foundation’s Community Pride Grant program.

If you wish to help Dee with the Second Street Garden, consider a cash, labor or materials donation. Contact her at The Crafty Maven.

© Copyright 2015 Audrey Kletscher Helbling

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37 Responses to “Community pride: A vision & two gardens, all because she cares about Faribault”

  1. Beth Ann Says:

    I love the good news snippet idea in the paper and after having the opportunity to meet Dee I can see how she was just the person to spearhead this project. What a lovely idea and a lovely way to transform an area into something more usable and definitely more appealing to the eyes. Thanks for sharing a positive thing today.

  2. treadlemusic Says:

    Every town has these forgotten spaces but not every town has a Dee!!!! Houston has several ppl who have the vision to turn these special areas into gardens. Perhaps larger towns struggle more with the idea of personal investment/responsibility than does one like ours. Lovely post!!!!!

  3. Dan Traun Says:

    What a great story and concept. I like the quit complaining about things aspect as well – do something! She did. Good for her; good for Faribault.

  4. Littlesundog Says:

    I have seen a lot of little nooks like this in odd areas of larger cities. I think they’re just lovely. It’s such a relaxing atmosphere, especially if there are little benches or tables to have lunch or just sit and visit.

  5. There is nothing better than green spaces and local gardens to bring a community together! In this recent move I looked for that sense of community and those green spaces because it is important part of feeling a sense of belonging. Beautiful Captures – Happy Day – Enjoy 🙂

  6. Great post. I love the addition of edible landscaping!!! There are always people who can use fresh food.

  7. Almost Iowa Says:

    She plans, too, to have a concrete pad installed for seating under a pergola. The city has promised a picnic table for seasonal placement.

    As a guy who spends a lot of time seating on benches while my wife shops, I appreciate a good place to sit. It is a wonderful place to meet people.

    • I appreciate your input. I, too, agree that benches provide a purpose other than simply as a place to sit. I hope that downtown Faribault will add benches. I’ve seen them in other downtowns and it helps create a sense of community.

  8. Dee Bjork Says:

    Thank you Audrey for such a wonderful story and photographs of the downtown gardens. The work done here involves lots of wonderful people contributing daily including my sisters Ann and Beth and our adopted friend Lynda. Be the change!

  9. Sweet Posy Dreams Says:

    Good for her, and good for the town. It’s great to see people get involved and make their town better. Even little things help. My husband and I pick up trash every day when we go for our walk. It isn’t much, but it makes the area a little more pleasant.

  10. I love that the editor got people moving and thinking! I think you have a beautiful city – and that downtown theater makes me drool it’s so lovely!

  11. Sue Ready Says:

    Creating what you call an oasis of gardens and vegetables in open spaces truly contributes to community pride.Here’s hoping others will tag on and the beautification will continue. Perhaps as you note more efforts in this direction by others you could highlight them in Friday Faces 🙂

  12. Jackie Says:

    What a good Idea and a great example for the community to create beauty instead of negativity! I have a thought about the utility boxes. Rochester has area artists paint murals on some of the downtown boxes, it’s a beautiful way to “hide” the utility boxes.

  13. Marneymae Says:

    This is so awesome!!!!!


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