Minnesota Prairie Roots

Writing and photography by Audrey Kletscher Helbling

Part III, outside the Paine: More from the gardens June 21, 2017

A lawn sweeps to the majestic front entry of The Paine.

A lawn sweeps to the majestic front entry of The Paine buffeted by the Evening Terrace. The public entry to the art center is to the left.

WHEN I TOUR an estate like The Paine Art Center and Gardens in Oshkosh, Wisconsin, my eyes lock on details. The heft of a door. The hue of a flower. The curve of a sculpture.

Massive doors define the entry.

Massive doors and architectural details define the entry.

The Paine presents many opportunities to embrace art. Natural and man-made. All connect to showcase an historic late 1920s mansion designed by Ithaca, New York architect Bryant Fleming. The English country house reflects three centuries of Tudor and Gothic styles all complemented by  beautiful gardens.

 

Details in architecture atop tne Kasota limestone walls.

Details in architecture and construction include the use of Kasota limestone.

Also noteworthy is the Minnesota connection to this Wisconsin site on the National Register of Historic Places. The home’s stonework is mostly Kasota limestone from southern Minnesota.

One of many garden "rooms."

One of many garden “rooms.”

 

A majestic native oak graces the front yard.

A majestic native oak graces the front yard.

 

Lucious planters frame a path to the patio.

Stately planters and lush plantings frame a path to the Morning Terrace.

The gardens, likewise, mimic perennials, trees and shrubs hardy to Minnesota. Given the climate similarities between the two states, this is logical. Annuals and bulbs are also incorporated into The Paine gardens.

Lilies bloomed during my July 2016 visit.

Lilies bloomed during my July 2016 visit.

Flowers in bloom during my mid-summer 2016 visit differ from those blooming earlier or later. The estate landscape is like an evolving art gallery. There’s a certain visual appeal in that, in observing nature’s art always changing.

BONUS PHOTOS:

The public entry to The Paine Art Center.

The public entry to The Paine Art Center.

 

The first sculpture I spotted, near the entry.

The first sculpture I spotted, near the entry.

 

My husband, Randy, plays a xylophone in a garden.

My husband, Randy, plays a xylophone in The Children’s Field Station.

 

One of many graceful sculptures.

One of many graceful sculptures.

FYI: For more information about The Paine Art Center and Gardens, click here. Then click here to read my first post from inside The Paine. Next, click here to read Part I and then Part II of my gardens series.

© Copyright 2017 Audrey Kletscher Helbling

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8 Responses to “Part III, outside the Paine: More from the gardens”

  1. treadlemusic Says:

    I will have to share that the first thought that came to me is that today’s dwellings (regardless of income/level of cost) are lacking. They are lacking in a timelessness and quality that will cause future viewers to merely comment on a style that places it in today’s time frame. I think it’s partially due to the fact that completion deadlines are the shortest possible so that “life”/routines may return to some sort of normalcy as quickly and smoothly as is possibly. I have known many who have entered into such a “construction phase” and the ensuing conversations resonate with the common thread of the schedule….either ahead or behind! I/we are quite content and happy in our cozy dwelling (maybe not technically “ours” any longer!!!! LOL!). Love this post and just know there would be a FAB quilting corner(?) for me and my stash!!!! LOL LOL LOL

  2. tcbcannon Says:

    Thanks for the info about the building materials from Minnesota. I live in Oshkosh and every so often its great to go and visit. Besides the exhibits, the house is fascinating and beautiful. The grounds are peaceful. I think they are redoing the grounds, but it was always a great place to go and take pictures of your family.

  3. Beautiful! Can you imagine the cleaning and yard work?


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