Minnesota Prairie Roots

Writing and photography by Audrey Kletscher Helbling

Near Faribault: Roberds Lake memorials honor veterans July 23, 2013

This boat was among two arriving for the 2 p.m. memorial dedication ceremony.

A boat arrives for the 2 p.m. memorial dedication ceremony at Roberds Lake.

THEY COME BY LAND and by lake Sunday afternoon to Geri Larson’s place along Roberds Lake near Faribault for the latest unveiling of a private veterans’ memorial, the third along the shoreline.

A portion of the crowd gathered for the ceremony. Attendees also lined a mulch-lined path along the steep side of the river bank to the read in this photo.

A portion of the crowd gathered for the ceremony. Attendees also line a mulch-lined path along the steep side of the lake bank. Jim Williams, who has two vets’ memorials on his property next door, starts the program.

Nearly half of the estimated 75 attendees are veterans, gathered here on Geri’s parcel of property between steep hillside and water, under the shade of trees, including a sturdy oak, to honor and remember.

Flags from the four branches of the military fly next to Geri Larson's cabin.

Flags from the four branches of the military fly next to Geri Larson’s cabin.

In a formal ceremony, while American and military flags waft in the breeze, folks listen to guest speakers and observe the protocols of a patriotic program—advancement of the colors by the Color Guard, a gun salute, playing of “Taps” and singing of the National Anthem.

Veterans arrive with flags and guns to start the dedication program.

Veterans arrive with flags and guns to start the dedication program.

Lloyd Grandprey waits to play taps.

Lloyd Grandprey waits to play “Taps.”

Emmee Grisim steps up to the podium to sing "The Star Spangled Banner."

Emmee Grisim, of Lake City and the niece of Jim Williams, steps up to the podium to sing “The Star Spangled Banner” as the program gets underway.

The occasional drone of a motor, in air and by water, breaks the rhythm of the program. “I told you the Air Force was coming,” retired National Guard Lt. Col. Roger Williams jokes as he notes a plane overhead, pausing in his talk focused on remembering and honoring, as far back as his family’s involvement in the Civil War to the more recent war in Iraq.

Hands on guns.

Hands on guns.

Occasional laughter erupts. But the tone of the 45-minute ceremony remains primarily serious, aimed at remembering, honoring and thanking those who served.

Geri Larson prepares to slice the cake, served along with sandwiches and beverages, after the dedication ceremony.

Before the ceremony, Geri Larson slices the patriotic themed cake which will be served along with sandwiches and beverages after dedication of the new vets’ memorial on her land.

That marks Geri Larson’s purpose in erecting the newest Roberds Lake veterans’ memorial, right next door to the two memorials on the property of Jim Williams, brother of Roger. Larson says the “Window in Time” piece honors the fallen and all veterans, including three of her brothers who served in the military.

Faribault American Legion Post 43 Commander Kirk Mansfield speaks before the unveiling.

Faribault American Legion Post 43 Commander Kirk Mansfield speaks before the unveiling.

Larson and Jim Williams’ neighbor, Faribault American Legion Post 43 Commander and Gulf War veteran Kirk Mansfield, was instrumental in establishing the Roberds Lake veterans’ memorials. He worked with others on the designs and then crafted “Window in Time” and “American Joe,” with his father, Dick, creating the POW/MIA memorial.

The "Window in Time" memorial shows a current day Marine praying before a grave/memorial. The young man depicted in the 4x8-foot steel sculpture is carrying a heavy burden, Kirk Mansfield notes, with the burden on his back representing a simple thank you. The tipped helmet also symbolizes thanks. The weapons are representative of those from WW II and the Korean War. The piece carries a theme of honoring and respecting elders. Mansfield was joined by many volunteers in working on the project.

The “Window in Time” memorial shows a current day Marine praying before a grave/memorial. The young man depicted in the 4-foot x 8-foot steel sculpture is carrying a heavy burden, Kirk Mansfield notes, with the burden on his back representing a simple thank you. The tipped helmet also symbolizes thanks. The weapons are representative of those from WW II and the Korean War. The piece carries a theme of honoring and respecting elders. Mansfield was joined by many volunteers in working on the project. It was installed on Saturday, dedicated on Sunday.

Mansfield tells the group gathered on Sunday that the newest memorial represents “a time for remembrance, solace and peace.”

He reflects on the numbers of Americans who have died in service to their country—some 1,500 since the “American Joe” memorial next door was dedicated in 2009 to 400,000-plus lives lost during WW II.

“The price of America’s freedom,” Mansfield notes, “is buried in the ground.”

BONUS PHOTOS:

Veterans participate in the program.

Veterans who participated in the program.

Friends greet friends before the dedication begins.

Friends greet friends before the dedication begins.

Geri Larson with her friend, George LaRoche, who installed the poles for the military flags on her property.

Geri Larson with her friend, George LaRoche, who installed the poles for the military flags on her property.

The POW/MIA memorial on Jim Williams' lakeshore.

The POW/MIA memorial created by Dick Mansfield and placed on Jim Williams’ lake shore.

The "American Joe" memorial was crafted by metal artist Kirk Mansfield, who "sits at a computer all day" in his professional career,

The “American Joe” memorial crafted by metal artist Kirk Mansfield, who “sits at a computer all day” at his paying job. The memorial was dedicated in 2009. The soldier represented in the art is from the 1970s, Jim Williams says. His brother, Gary, served during that time, in Vietnam.

© Copyright 2013 Audrey Kletscher Helbling

Advertisements