Minnesota Prairie Roots

Writing and photography by Audrey Kletscher Helbling

Signs: Wear a mask, don’t drink… July 31, 2020

Posted on a softball diamond fence in North Alexander Park, but applicable to all Faribault city parks.

 

SIGNS, OR PERHAPS more accurately notices, are posted seemingly everywhere these days. Mostly to inform us about COVID-19 related issues. They are necessary reminders and sometimes required by executive mandates, like the new order in Minnesota requiring face masks to be worn in indoor public places.

 

Businesses and other public places are required by the new Minnesota executive order to post signage requiring masks. This is posted on the door of a downtown Faribault business.

 

Minnesota’s mask mandate went into effect July 25. I’m happy to report that when I went grocery shopping last Saturday morning, I saw only one unmasked person—an elderly man. At the Faribault Farmers’ Market, some vendors and customers wore masks. Others didn’t. Masks are not required outdoors if you can safely social distance.

 

I found this strong warning on a notice attached to a side door along a side street in downtown Faribault.

 

We’re off to a good start, Faribault. It took an executive order from Minnesota Governor Tim Walz to do what we should have done along for the health of all. Thank you for complying. And for those of you who have been masking up prior, thank you for long ago recognizing the importance of this simple preventative measure.

 

The two-page Adult Softball Safety Plan hung on the fence behind home plate and in front of the bleachers.

 

Page one of the safety plan.

 

A close-up of the safety plan document, page 2.

 

While out and about last Sunday, including a morning walk in North Alexander Park, I spotted an abundance of signage posted on fences at a softball diamond. I paused to read messages like the two-page Faribault Parks and Recreation Adult Softball Safety Plan, which focuses on health and safety as it relates to COVID-19.

 

Softball league rules.

 

The alcohol ban is noted in rule #4.

 

But then I found another sign—Adult Softball League Details—which has likely been here for some time and is posted inside the fence behind home plate. Of special interest was rule #4: Drinking of any alcoholic beverage is prohibited by any coach, manager or player while the game’s in progress. An exception allows a player to drink alcohol if he takes himself out of the game and goes to the spectator area.

 

This dugout sign prohibits alcohol consumption.

 

Yet, when I saw signs on the exterior of fences surrounding the dugouts I noticed a discrepancy. One read: NO ALCOHOL ALLOWED IN DUGOUTS. The other read: ALCOHOL ALLOWED IN DUGOUTS. So which is it?

 

But the sign at the other dugout supposedly allows alcohol.

 

I was momentarily baffled until Randy pointed out that someone had vandalized the sign to remove the word NO. Upon closer inspection, I agreed with that observation.

I expect those involved with softball in Faribault know the no drinking rule. It’s common sense that if you’re actively playing a sport, consuming alcohol seems a bad idea. Just like going mask-less and/or congregating at a bar during a global pandemic are really bad ideas. Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey this week issued an emergency order, effective Saturday evening, which limits service in bars. Patrons can no longer order or drink at the bar/counter. Now all drinks must be served while patrons are seated at tables. The reason: Nearly 400 cases of COVID-19 linked to people going to bars in Minneapolis.

Let’s continue to mask up. Social distance. Wash/sanitize your hands. Avoid gatherings. And, in general, use common sense.

Think of others, not just yourself. Be safe. Stay healthy.

© Copyright 2020 Audrey Kletscher Helbling

 

A pleasant afternoon hiking & photographing at River Bend Nature Center until… April 10, 2017

 

SUNDAY’S UNUSUALLY WARM weather drew me back to Faribault’s River Bend Nature Center, this time for a walk that centered more on prairie than woods.

 

My husband, Randy, poses by one of River Bend’s biggest cottonwoods next to a parking lot nearest the center’s entrance.

 

With camera once again in hand, I scanned for photo ops, many pointed out by my hiking companion husband. I appreciate that he understands and supports my interest in photography.

 

 

As we hiked, I noticed a theme connecting nearly everything that drew my interest. I was focusing on texture—in dried prairie grass,

 

The deeply textured bark of a cedar tree.

 

bark,

 

 

new leaves,

 

 

a cone of seeds,

 

 

fungi,

 

 

a milkweed pod,

 

 

moss,

 

 

pussy willow,

 

 

 

the remnants of last season’s cattails…

Because the landscape remains so stark yet in early April in Minnesota, the eye catches such details. Or at least my eyes.

 

 

Yet several things distracted me from texture: the red dot of a bug and the red dash of a cardinal,

 

Randy and I hung out on the pond dock for awhile listening to the frogs and watching the geese.

 

the overwhelming roar of frogs,

 

 

the mating antics and flight of geese and then, the most unexpected—the sight of a sixty-something man walking toward us with a gun holstered and strapped to his belt.

 

We met the gun-carrying man not far from a bird observation deck marked by this sign.

 

The surprise showing of that weapon unsettled me. I couldn’t shake the feeling that this just was not right for a person to be walking in a nature center on a Sunday afternoon with a handgun at his waist for all—including children—to see. Back home I checked the nature center website. Under Visitor Rules and Regulations, I found this:

Therefore, it shall be unlawful, except upon permission of the Executive Director or his/her agent, for any person to:

15. Possess or use any firearms, air guns, paintball guns, archery equipment, or other weapons within the nature center; or discharge any missile or other projectile from such a weapon into the nature center from beyond nature center boundaries without prior approval by River Bend’s board of directors (example: prescribed deer management hunts);

In my opinion, common sense should tell anyone not to carry a weapon into a nature center.

Thoughts?

© Copyright 2017 Audrey Kletscher Helbling